Category Archives: Accounting

The Accounting Cycle

The Accounting Cycle is a series of steps that businesses take to track transactions and consolidate financial information over a specific accounting period (month, quarter, year). The end result of is the production of accurate financial statements for that period and preparedness for the next accounting period. Read this article for more information.

Cost Accounting

One area of accounting is cost accounting, which focuses on internal reporting for the purpose of improving managerial decision making. Key concepts include cost allocation, cost-volume-profit and the role of a double break-even!

Creating Financial Statements

A company’s financial statements give investors, managers, and other “users” a complete, honest look at its financial health. Finished financial statements follow a standardized format, letting investors compare different companies in the same industry apples-to-apples. These include Income Statements, Balance Sheets, and Cash Flow statements.

Managerial Accounting

Managerial accounting is the use of accounting tools to make internal decisions. This is different than financial accounting, which is used to communicate to auditors and investors. Managers in a company use managerial accounting to help with making strategic decisions.

The Love of Money: Audits and Fraud

Greed most commonly manifests as financial fraud in businesses, driven by individuals looking to enrich themselves and their companies by ANY means. Financial audits are used to identify fraud (or general shady bookkeeping practices)

Corporate Debt

Do you ever wonder how companies have the money to build new stores, develop new products, or perhaps even buy another company? Usually companies do not keep enough cash for these transactions sitting in their bank account – it needs to be raised from outside investors. This process creates corporate debt.

Ownership and Dividends

Owning a share in a company means that you are an integral part of the puzzle that helps the company tick. Typically, investors choose to own a stock for one of two profit driven reasons: the dividends they will receive from the company, or the hope that the stock price will increase and they will be able to sell it for a higher price than they purchased it at.

Issuance of Stocks and Paying Dividends

Big corporations are very powerful entities that can possess more capital than some countries in the world. However, every company begins as a small start-up business. Once a private company grows large enough, they can become public, meaning they sell stocks to the public to finance future endeavors. After selling stocks to the public, the company will have to pay dividends to those who have chosen to invest in them.

What is Solvency?

Solvency is the possession of assets in excess of liabilities, or more simply put, the ability for one to pay their debts. People and organizations who are not “Solvent” face bankruptcy

Cash Planning

A cash budget is used internally by management to estimate cash inflows (receipts) and outflows (disbursements) of cash during a period and the cash balance at the end of a period. In other words, a cash budget is a plan for an organization to obtain and use resources over a specific period of time. Profitable businesses go bankrupt every day because of cash flow problems – don’t let it happen to you!