Category Archives: Stocks

Stock Volatility

Stock volatility information can be used in many different ways but here is a quick and easy bit of stock volatility information that you can begin using today.

Stock Symbols

If you are brand new to investing then take time to understand what you are reading when viewing a Stock Exchange Symbol and learn Stock Market Investing Basics.

The Power of Supply and Demand on Stock Prices

Stock prices are a direct result of supply and demand. All the other influences like debt, balance sheets, earnings and so on affect the desirability of owning (or selling) a stock. This article details why supply and demand create changes in stock prices, and what a drop in price means in terms of supply and demand.

ETFs vs Stocks

What are the differences between investing in Exchange Traded Funds verses stocks? This article will discuss the pros and cons …

What Are Stocks?

This article describes the basics you need to know about stocks, which are shares in ownership of a company. Stocks represents a claim on the company’s assets and earnings.

Dividend

Dividends are payments made by a corporation to its shareholder members. It is the portion of corporate profits paid out to stockholders. When a corporation earns a profit or surplus, that money can be put to two uses: it can either be re-invested in the business (called retained earnings), or it can be distributed to shareholders. There are two ways to distribute cash to shareholders: share repurchases or dividends. Many corporations retain a portion of their earnings and pay the remainder as a dividend.

Class B shares

Class B Shares are a form of common stock that may have more or less voting rights that Class A shares. Generally Class B shares have lesser voting rights, but be vary of some companies¬†that trick investors by using the perception of Class “B” (compared to “A”) shares to attach more voting rights to them than Class A shares.

Class A shares

Class A Shares are a form of common stock that may have more or less voting rights that Class B shares. Generally Class A shares have more voting rights, but companies sometimes trick investors by using the perception of “Class A” shares to attach fewer voting rights to them than Class B shares.